Friday, March 13, 2009

Preparation and Perspiration

I'm not sure how soon it happens after I leave the house but at some point Emily curls up against the front door and waits for me to come home. Most of the time she pops up before I get the lock unclicked and starts wagging and wiggling to greet me. She's pretty old now. She's at least 14 by the vet's dental reckoning. Sometimes these days she can't quite get all the way up before I start opening the door and I whack her on the butt by accident. I've taken to opening the door quite gently since the whacking, even when accidental, makes me feel guilty.

Today is an early day for me. I'm home from class and taking some time to arrange some things before I go pick up my beloved Bobster and play with him. When I got home I felt the familiar whack of an unmoved dog but I didn't hear any scrambling. I gently shoved the door again. She hadn't moved. At this point I had to swallow my own heart. It did not taste good. I shoved again gently but more firmly and could stick my head in the door to see. There she was, eyes closed, curled up in the exact corner where the door opens. To my credit I didn't freak out, I've been taught to squelch the freaking out in an emergency. I called her name. She didn't open her eyes but her ear twitched. Her ear twitched! So I booted her in the butt again and called to her. Finally she woke up, SLOWLY, and proceeded with the wagging and wiggling and I went inside and gave her a very expensive treat before I put my head between my knees so I wouldn't pass out.

Stupid dog. She's not dead but she might be deaf!

10 comments:

  1. Oh, yikes. Honey, I got scared just READING that. Give her a treat for me, too, wouldja?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Baaad boochy! Do NOT scare Mommy like that. Good boochy for breathing though. Keep that up!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have to put my head between my legs....hold on.


    Treats from me, too.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Do NOT scare me like that again!

    ReplyDelete
  5. MASSIVE empathy coming from me! I have one reaching that stage, too, and yes I know how unpleasant one's own heart tastes in those moments.

    ReplyDelete
  6. She might be deaf. My beloved malamute went deaf and it took a while for us to realize it. We thought he was just being stubborn, but he really couldn't hear us.

    Try some tests (clapping hands suddenly outside her vision, calling, etc.) and also next time you take her to the vet, ask the vet.

    One good suggestion I was given - which we did not carry out, but that doesn't mean it;s not a good one - was to start using hand signals along with voice commands, so the dog will get used to them before hearing is completely gone.

    ReplyDelete
  7. aw...
    I can relate. The pet owner's life is a tough one. We're constantly on guard for the emergency and sometimes they happen.

    14 is awesome for a doggy. Glad to know she's okay.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh...sweet doggie. I like G's suggestion about the hand signals. Deafness is pretty common in old dogs, I think.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Jeebus! I'm sure it's just a case of the deafness....now you can sneak up on her like Mallow! Thanks for helping with Bob.

    ReplyDelete
  10. She does actually know a lot of hand signals and works a lot off of body language which makes it hard to tell if she's deaf. On the other hand she responds to a whistle still so she's not completely deaf yet. Yet.

    No problem, Kath, happy to have him around. He was (mostly) an angel.

    ReplyDelete